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The history of the decline and fall of the Roman Empire, Volume 2

 By Edward Gibbon

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Full view - Item notes: v. 2 - 1876 - History


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Edition 5 - 1911 - Snippet view
Edition 1 - 1995 - Limited preview

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JSTOR: The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.
Editorial Review - jstor.org
Book Reviews The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. By Edward Gibbon. 3 volumes. Edited and introduced by David Womersley. ...

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The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire ...
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The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, by Edward ...
But as I have presumed to lay before the public a first volume only 1 of the History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, it will, perhaps, ...
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Internet Archive: Details: The History of the Decline and Fall of ...
The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, a major literary achievement of the 18th century published in six volumes, was written by the ...
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The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Wikiquote
The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (in 3 sets of dual volumes: 1776, 1781, 1788) by Edward Gibbon. One of the most famous historical ...
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JSTOR: The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire
The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. By EDWARD GIBBON. Edited by jb BURY. Vol. II. (London: Methuen & Co. 1896. ...
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The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, a major literary achievement of Eighteenth Century, was written by the British historian, ...
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Decline and fall of Roman Empire - includes related excerpt from ...
The first volume of Gibbon's The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire appeared in 1776, the year of the Declaration of Independence and the ...
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Online Library of Liberty - 12.: THE TYRANT CONSTANTINE — ( P. 178 ...
The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, ed. jb Bury with an Introduction by weh Lecky (New York: Fred de Fau and Co., 1906), in 12 vols. ...
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The History of the Decline and Fall of The Roman Empire - Vol 3 ...
Reign And Conversion Of Clovis. -- His Victories Over The Alemanni, Burgundians, And Visigoths. -- Establishment Of The French Monarchy In Gaul
www.worldwideschool.org/ library/ books/ hst/ roman/ TheDeclineandFallofTheRomanEmpire-3/ chap43.html

Places mentioned in this book  Maps  KML

Rome - Page 13
But the princes and 'magistrates of ancient Rome were strangers to those principles which inspired and authorized the inflexible obstinacy of the ...
more pages: 7 32 104 105 173 201 218 219 287 381
Rimini - Page 324
The council of Rimini was not allowed to separate, till the members had imprudently subscribed a captious creed, u which some expressions, ...
more pages: 287 320 331 332 352
Edessa - Page 472
to those of his predecessor, he might have wasted the active and important season of the year in the circus of Samosata or in the churches of Edessa. ...
more pages: 182 184 230 454 520
Milan - Page 295
The edict of Milan, the great charter of toleration, had confirmed to each individual of the Roman world the privilege of choosing and professing his ...
more pages: 75 138 210 211 234 252 257 284 344 530
Jerusalem - Page 436
restore tho ancient glory of the temple of Jerusalem.TM At the Christians were firmly persuaded that a sentence of everlasting destruction had been ...
more pages: 3 5 16 431 433 434 435 437 439 440
Athens - Page 203
of the education and adventures of Julian is contained in the epistle or manifesto which he himself addressed to the senate and people of Athens. ...
more pages: 7 40 193 211 212 213 291 310 409 418
Vienna - Page 47
The martyrs of Vienna and Lyons arc assigned by Dodwell to the seventh, by most writers to the seventeenth. In fact, the commencement of the ...
more pages: 234 374 380 386
Poitiers - Page 320
In the celebrated parallel between atheism and superstition, the bishop of Poitiers would have been surprised in the philosophic society of Bayle and ...
more pages: 323
Comana - Page 136
They suppressed the rich temple of Comana, where the high priest of the goddess of war supported the dignity of a sovereign prince ; and they applied ...
London - Page 568
The citizens of London, who had almost despaired of their safety, threw open their gates ; and as soon as Theodosius had obtained from the court of ...
more pages: 97 270 436 563
Ptolemais - Page 290
the reign of the younger Theodosius, the polite and eloquent Synesius, one of the descendants of Hercules,1" filled th» episcopal seat of Ptolemais, ...
more pages: 291
Tripoli - Page 571
The president of Tripoli, who had presumed to pity the distress of the province, was publicly executed at Utica ; four distinguished citizens were put ...
more pages: 569 570
Tiberias - Page 5
The patriarch, who had fixed his residence at Tiberias, was empowered to appoint his subordinate ministers and apostles, to exercise a domestic ...
more pages: 432
Gloucester - Page 436
71 The secret intentions of Julian are revealed by the late bishop of Gloucester, the learned and dogmatic Warburton ; who, with the authority of a ...
Eleusis - Page 418
He obtained the privilege of a solemn initiation into the mysteries of Eleusis, which, amidst the general decay of the Grecian worship, still retained ...
Paris - Page 97
Yet Constan. linople must yield to Babylon and Thebes," to ancient Rome, to London, and even to Paris." The master of the Roman world, who aspired to ...
more pages: 240 246 372 375 376 382 410 555
Istria - Page 209
In the close of the evening he was arrested, ignominiously stripped of the ensigns of Caesar, and hurried away to Pola,f in Istria, a sequestered ...
more pages: 160
Cologne - Page 240
Without allowing the Franks to unite or deliberate, he skilfully spread his legions from Cologne to the ocean ; and by the terror, as well as by the ...
more pages: 216 235
Marmara - Page 90
Between the Bosphorus and the Hellespont, the shores of Europe and Asia, receding on either side, enclose the sea of Marmara, which was known to the ...
Venice - Page 85
The priority of time gives some advantage to the evidence of the former, which he loses, on the other hand, by the distance of Venice from the ...
Bologna - Page 249
The obstacles which he had probably experienced in his own mind, instructed him to proceed with caution in the momentous uscript of Bologna, which the ...
Naples - Page 552
of the apostolic fishermen, and the royal state of a temporal prince, whose dominions extend from the confines of Naples to the banks of the Po. ...
York - Page 154
The boundless ambition, which, from the moment of his accepting the purple at York, appears as the ruling passion of his soul, may be justified by the ...
more pages: 293
Saragossa - Page 71
Vincent, we may suspect that the celebrated deacon and martyr of that name had been inaccurately assigned by Prudentius, <fec., to Saragossa, ...
Augusta - Page 189
That cruel and aspiring woman, who had obtained from the great Constantine, her father, the rank of Augusta, placed the diadem with her own hands on ...
Megara - Page 87
His followers were drawn from Arg'os and Megara. Byzantium was afterwards rebuili and fortified by the Spartan general Pausanias. ...
Glasgow - Page 567
If, in the neighborhood of the commercial and literary town of Glasgow, a race of cannibals has really existed, we may contemplate, in the period of ...
Damascus - Page 479
The tribe of Gassan had settled on the edge of Syria, and reigned some time in Damascus, under a dynasty of thirty-one kings, or emirs, from the time ...
Apollonia - Page 480
and peculiar appellation of Adiabene ; and he seems to fix Teredon, Vologesia, and Apollonia, as the extreme cities of the actual province of Assyria. ...
Lucques - Page 294
668 — 073, edition de Lucques. The author, M. de docteur Bouchaud, has discussed, according to the principles of the Galilean church, the principal ...
Florence - Page 18
happily with the rest of the sentence, James Groravins has preferred the reading of utmjtauti, which is authorized by the valuable MS. of Florence. ...
Brussels - Page 258
See the relations which Bentivoglio (who was then nuncio at Brussels, and afterwards cardinal) transmitted to the court of Borne, (Relnzione, ...
Spoleto - Page 443
5, (published the 17th of June, received, at Spoleto in Italy, the 29th of July, AD 363,) with Godefroy's Illustrations, torn. vp 31. ...
Carthago - Page 112
et Constantinopolis de imitatione, el Aiitiocliin pro luxu, et discincta Carthago, et domus fluminis Alexan Jria, sed Treviri Principis beneficio. ...
Reims - Page 138
181 For the Agentes in Reims, see Ammian. L xv. c. 3, L xvi. c. 5, L xxii. c. 7, with the curious annotations of Valesius. Cod. Theod. ...
Marha - Page 222
exclaimed with a loud voice, Marha! Marha!* a word of defiance, which was received as a signal of the tumult They rushed with fury to seize the person ...
Jand - Page 432
his residence at Tiberias;" anJ the neighboring cities of Palestine were filled with the remains of a people who fondly adhered to the promised Jand. ...
Austin - Page 288
But they still resorted to the tribunal of the bishops, whose abilities and integrity they esteemed ; and the venerable Austin enjoyed the ...
Syriam - Page 231
Omisso vano incepto, hiematurus Antiochisa redit in Syriam serumnosam, perpessus et ulcerum sed et atrocia, diuque denenda. ...

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Popular passages

The noble art, which had once been preserved as the sacred inheritance of the patricians, was fallen into the hands of freedmen and plebeians,13* who, with cunning rather than with skill, exercised a sordid and pernicious trade. Some of them procured admittance into families for the purpose of fomenting differences, of encouraging suits, and of preparing a harvest of gain for themselves or their brethren. Others, recluse in their chambers, maintained the...Page 123
O'er bog or steep, through strait, rough, dense, or rare, With head, hands, wings, or feet, pursues his way, And swims, or sinks, or wades, or creeps, or flies.Page 386
The agriculture of the Roman provinces was insensibly ruined, and, in the progress of despotism, which tends to disappoint its own purpose, the emperors were obliged to derive some merit from the forgiveness of debts, or the remission of tributes, which their subjects were utterly incapable of paying. According to the new division of Italy, the fertile and happy province of Campania, the scene of the early victories and of the delicious retirements of the citizens of Rome, extended between the sea...Page 144
Those persons who, from their age, or sex, or occupations, were the least qualified to judge, who were the least exercised in the habits of abstract reasoning, aspired to contemplate the economy of the Divine Nature ; and it is the boast of Tertullian w that a Christian mechanic could readily answer such questions as had perplexed the wisest of the Grecian sages.Page 311
The cities which signalized a forward zeal by the voluntary destruction of their temples, were distinguished by municipal privileges, and rewarded with popular donatives; and the new capital of the East gloried in the singular advantage that Constantinople was never profaned by the worship of...Page 274
Though his situation might excite the pity, his arguments could never reach the understanding, either of the philosophic or of the believing part of the Pagan world. To their apprehensions it was no less a matter of surprise that any individuals should entertain scruples against complying with the established mode of worship than if they had conceived a sudden abhorrence to the manners, the dress, or the language of their native country.Page 7
Turkish oppression, still exhibit a rich prospect of vineyards, of gardens, and of plentiful harvests; and the Propontis has ever been renowned for an inexhaustible store of the most exquisite fish, that are taken in their stated seasons, without skill, and almost without labour.Page 94
Scythia, and far as the sources of the Tanais and the Borysthenes; whatsoever was manufactured by the skill of Europe or Asia; the corn of Egypt, and the gems and spices of the farthest India, were brought by the varying winds into the port of Constantinople, which for many ages attracted the commerce of the ancient world.Page 94
Christ to that memorable rebellion, we cannot discover any traces of Roman intolerance, unless they are to be found in the sudden, the transient, but the cruel persecution, which was exercised by Nero against the Christians of the capital, thirty-five years after the former, and only two years before the latter, of those great events.Page 16
The face of the country was interspersed with groves of innumerable palm-trees, and the diligent natives celebrated, either in verse or prose, the three hundred and sixty uses to which the trunk, the branches, the leaves, the juice, and the fruit were skilfully applied.Page 481

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